Fed-up couple call on the council to end their misery

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A husband and wife have pleaded with Lincolnshire County Council to end ‘years of living hell’ by re-surfacing a mile-long lane which leads to their home.

A husband and wife have pleaded with Lincolnshire County Council to end ‘years of living hell’ by re-surfacing a mile-long lane which leads to their home.

Robert and Gillian Swainston have been complaining to the authority about the condition of Holmes Road near Stixwould.

They say friends and family refuse to visit them, because the road is so bad.

Mr Swainston said: “We’re at the end of our tether.

“We read in the Horncastle News about a road in Hagworthingham which residents say is apparently the worst in the county.

“Well, ours must push it very close. We’ve relatives in Uganda and they have better village roads than us.

“No-one should have to put up with this.”

Mr and Mrs Swainston say when they complained the police, an officer counted 75 potholes in a single stretch of the lane.

They say they have to contend with farm traffic which often leaves a covering of ‘stinking mud’.

Mr Swainston said the county council had already settled two claims for damage to his car and he was in the process of submitting a third.

He added: “We bought the house about seven years ago but it was nowhere near as bad.

“We’ve had the Post Office refuse to deliver letters.

“We recently bought something from an antiques shop owned by Craig Leyland (East Lindsey District Council leader) and he personally delivered it. I don’t think he’ll be rushing back. “

Mr Swainston said he had planning permission to convert outbuildings at his property into holiday cottages.

He admitted there was ‘no point’ going ahead with the project, until something was done about the lane.

He added: “You can’t see some of the potholes because they are covered in mud.”

The couple say their neighbours have also complained.

A local highways manager for the county council said: “We’re aware of the damage on Holmes Road which appears to be the result of agricultural traffic.

“We have carried out repairs in the past but the wet and muddy nature of the track, coupled its continued use by heavy farm vehicles, means that fresh damage quickly appears.

“We are arranging for these potholes to be filled and are also considering it for our resurfacing programme.

“However, we currently have a significant backlog of potholes to deal with and need to prioritise repairs to busier routes.”