Horncastle council spends £3,000 in bid to cut speeding

Slow down: Louth Road in Horncastle which was one of the suggested sites by Town Councillors for the new speed device to be located

Slow down: Louth Road in Horncastle which was one of the suggested sites by Town Councillors for the new speed device to be located

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Horncastle Town Council has agreed to spend £3,000 on new equipment to monitor vehicles in recognised speeding ‘hot spots.’

Councillors voted last week to purchase an ‘interactive device’ which will be moved between different locations in the town.

Data from the device will then be used to support any calls to reduce speed and improve road safety in specific roads and streets.

The device will cost around £2,000, but there will be an extra outlay on installation and mounting ‘plates’ which will be used to attach the equipment to lamp-posts.

Mayor Sandra Campbell-Wardman said: “We have areas of the town where people perceive there is a problem with speeding.

“This machine will record data which could then be used - if we decide any action needs to be taken.”

Councillors discussed several potential locations including Stanhope Road, Louth Road, Lincoln Road and Jubilee Way.

Coun Linda Baker said Jubilee Way was a particular concern.

Coun Campbell-Wardman identified Skegness Road while Coun Matthew Wilkinson said “all the main approaches” to the town needed to be monitored.

Police have already staged speed checks in several of those locations following complaints by residents.

However, their findings suggested there were no areas of particular concern.

Residents in Stanhope Road, though, are still campaigning for speed to be reduced.

They claim Stanhope Road has become a “rat run” with vehicles 
regularly breaking the 30mph limit.

Councillors agreed Stanhope Road would be one of the potential locations.

They also heard county councillor Bill Aron was purchasing a similar device from his own allowance.

However, they were told that would be utilised throughout Coun Aron’s ward, 
which includes several Wolds villages.

Meanwhile, councillors voted to replace two of the town’s CCTV cameras at an estimated cost of around £1,800 each.

A recent examination had revealed the cameras were out-of-date, ineffective and could not be repaired.