New Horncastle shop is really bewitching

Tarot cards at the ready: The Rev Shelley Mayes at her recently opened shop in West Street, Horncastle. Photo: John Aron
Tarot cards at the ready: The Rev Shelley Mayes at her recently opened shop in West Street, Horncastle. Photo: John Aron
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It’s amazing what you can buy in Horncastle’s West Street these days.

A ride-on lawnmower, award-winning cuisine, an historic book, a real witch’s broomstick and even a spell or two.

Don’t be surprised by those latter two items because a relatively new shop - Flange and Prong - is already making quite an impression.

It is a pagan and spiritual shop - surely a first for Horncastle - and is run by the Rev Shelley Mayes who describes herself as a ‘real witch.’

She does wear a black cape (no pointed hat) but is far removed from the traditional image most people have of witches.

“We haven’t all got a hooked nose and warts,” says the Rev Mayes.

“We’re good witches. We only do good spells, positive spells that can help people physically or mentally.”

She is adamant the spells work.

And she is not about to turn any awkward customers into frogs or bats explaining: “Whatever spell we do, we get back three-fold. Our motto is ‘Do thy well and harm no-one.’”

The shop sells ‘pagan stock’ from wall mountings to tarot cards and, of course, broomsticks which, according to the Rev Mayes, should be stacked ‘brush up’ - downwards is bad luck.

She also dismisses any suggestion broomsticks can be used for flying - or a quick game of quidditch. Instead, they should be used to sweep a ‘clear space’.

Through the shop, the Rev Mayes provides services like tarot reading (£30 a time), past life regression and workshops.

She adds: “I am slightly unusual as I am also a Reverend so I can do pagan weddings, naming days, even funerals.”

Born in London, the Rev Mayes says she is ‘a third generation pagan’.

She has written three children’s books, all based on Morvinda, a witch with a wonky wand.

She admits people raise more than the odd eyebrow when she says she’s a witch but adds: “That’s what I am.”

She says JK Rowling’s Harry Potter books and films (she is a fan) have been good for the image of witches. “I think that generally, we are more acceptable,” she adds.

She stresses paganism in Lincolnshire is very much thriving and believes there is a market for her unusual shop adding: “It’s a lovely town and people have been really welcoming and supportive.”