Apple-asing event with plenty of varieties

David Bailey and Patty Phillips of the Lincolnshire Organic Gardners Organisation with over 25 varieties of dessert apples which visitors could taste during sundays Apple Day held in Wragby Town Hall.Some of the apples were old English and their orgins went back to the late 1700s, with many Victorian types. EMN-140928-185141001
David Bailey and Patty Phillips of the Lincolnshire Organic Gardners Organisation with over 25 varieties of dessert apples which visitors could taste during sundays Apple Day held in Wragby Town Hall.Some of the apples were old English and their orgins went back to the late 1700s, with many Victorian types. EMN-140928-185141001

If you’ve ever wondered what kind of apples were growing on that tree in your garden, experts at Wragby Apple Day had the answer on Sunday.

The East of England Apples and Orchard Project (EEAOP) organised the 4th Wragby Apple Day hosted at Wragby Town Hall by Lincolnshire Organic Gardeners’ Organisation (LOGO) and more than 100 varieties of apple were waiting to be discovered by visitors.

Lincolnshire has a fine apple growing tradition and EEAOP members invited visitors to bring along their apples for identification, on the look out for the ‘lost’ Lincolnshire varieties, such as Garrett’s Golden Pippin, Old Man, Shepherd’s Fame, William Ingall, which were produced by the local nurseries of William Ingall at Louth, Rowsons at West Torrington or Pennells at Lincoln.

And even BBC Radio Lincolnshire’s Pirate Gold stopped off at the event in their hunt for clues.

Pictured are David Bailey and Patty Phillips of the Lincolnshire Organic Gardners Organisation with over 25 varieties of dessert apples. Some of the apples were old English and their origins went back to the late 1700s, with many Victorian types.

Other stalls on show included Lincolnshire Beekeepers, Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, Skidbrook Cider, Butterfly Conservation and Lincolnshire Willow basketmaking.